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Banning pro-ana websites? Not a good idea, as Web censorship might have a 'toothpaste tube effect'

[Update 05.04.13: A longer version of this post, with revised results, has evolved into a full-fledged article published by the UK Royal Society. To cite the article: A. A. Casilli, F. Pailler, P. Tubaro (2013). Online networks of eating disorder websites: why censoring pro ana might be a bad idea, Perspectives in Public Health , vol. 133, n.2, p. 94 95. As part of our research project ANAMIA (Ana-mia Sociability: an Online/Offline Social Networks Approach to Eating Disorders), the post has been featured in a number of media venues, including The Economist, Libération, Le Monde, Boing Boing, The Huffingtonpost, CBC Radio Canada, DRadio Wissen, Voice of Russia.]

Tumblr, Pinterest and the toothpaste tube

On February 23rd, 2012 Tumblr announced its decision to turn the screw on self-harm blogs: suicide, mutilation and most prominently thinspiration – i.e. the ritualized exchange of images and quotes meant to inspire readers to be thin. This cultural practice is distinctive of the pro-ana (anorexia nervosa), pro-mia (bulimia) and pro-ED (eating disorders) groups online: blogs, forums, and communities created by people suffering from eating-related conditions, who display a proactive stance and critically abide by medical advice.

A righteous limitation of harmful contents or just another way to avoid liability by marginalizing a stigmatized subculture? Whatever your opinion, it might not come as a surprise that the disbanded pro-ana Tumblr bloggers are regrouping elsewhere. Of all places, they are surfacing on Pinterest, the up-and-coming photo-sharing site. Here’s how Sociology in Focus relates the news: (more…)

Phd thesis on mobile blogging and everyday life

There is a growing interest in Academia in the impact of photosharing and photoblogging via popular services such as Flickr or Tumblr. Not only the very notion of publicly sharing personal pictures challenges common sense in regard to privacy and intellectual property, it also provides rich tools for ethnographic exploration and “witnessing” of everyday life – as recently highlighted by visual historian André Gunthert.

Soren Mork Petersen’ PhD thesis comes as a timely contribution to this research thread: Common Banality: The Affective Character of Photo Sharing, Everyday Life and Produsage Cultures was defended on January 2009 at the ITU Copenhagen – and supervised by an old acquaintance and former colleague of mine, Adrian Mackenzie.

mobloggingcopenhagen

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